Homeowners Guide to the Pennsylvania Uniform Construction Code

Please be advised that the following only serves as a guide for the PA UCC permit. 

Many townships, boroughs and cities in Pennsylvania have amended the state's Uniform Construction Code (UCC) to impose additional, more restrictive requirements than those contained in the state law or the codes adopted by the UCC.

Each Municipality has been given a choice to opt in or opt out of administering and enforcing the UCC. 

Each municipality that has and "opt in" to administer and enforce the UCC must have a designated Building Code Official.

Callery Borough is an opt in municipality.  The Callery Borough Council by order of Ordinance 97 - AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOROUGH OF CALLERY, BUTLER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, ADOPTING THE PROVISION OF THE UNIFORM CONSTRUCTION CODE PROVIDING FOR ITS ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT ESTABLISHING A BOARD OF APPEALS  adopted on November 1, 2004.

You must contact either the township office or the building code official to obtain

Information on whether the type of work you wish to perform requires a permit.
Permit applications.
Requirements for plans and construction documents required for the type of work you wish to
        perform.
Permit fee schedules.
Inspection requirements.
Occupancy permits applications and requirements.

Please keep in mind that doing work regulated by the UCC without a permit will result in an enforcement action being taken against you by the municipality, and upon conviction, you may be subject to fines and penalties up to and including $1,000 per day of each violation.

Also, occupying a structure without a Certificate of Occupancy issued by the Building Code Official is a serious violation and will also result in enforcement action.  Please do not occupy or begin using any structure without a Certificate of Occupancy!

If you fail to obtain permits, inspections and certificates of occupancy, it is very likely that you will have serious difficulties when you eventually try to sell your house or property, as all structures built since April 9, 2004 must have a legal certificate of occupancy.

WHAT NEEDS A RESIDENTIAL PERMIT?

By state law, you will need a permit, inspections and a certificate of occupancy for:

Any new house (one or two family dwelling)
Any addition to an existing house
           Constructing a new one or more new stories on top of an existing house.
          Increasing the perimeter of the existing house.
Installing a new manufactured home (HUD Code)
Installing a new modular home.
Relocating and installing a used manufactured home.
Any garage or carport that is attached to the house.
Any garage, carport, shed, or greenhouse that is not attached to a single family dwelling and is
       1,000 square feet or larger (measuring the perimeter)
Any garage, carport, shed, or greenhouse that is not attached to a two family dwelling or
        townhouse and is 120 square feet or larger (measuring the perimeter)
Enclosing a porch or patio.
Installing/building a sunroom or three season room.
Installing any deck that is more than 30" above ground level at any point around the perimeter of
        the deck.
Installing any deck less than 30" above ground level if it has a roof/covering above it.
Installing an indoor or outdoor hot tub or spa
Constructing an in ground swimming pool (inside or outside).
Installing any swimming pool (including inflatable type) that has a water depth of 24' or more.
Installing a fence higher than 6'.
Installing any retaining wall higher than 4'.
Structural alterations to an existing dwelling unit (BCO will determine if the work you intend to
       perform involves structural alterations).
Changes to an existing means of egress (exit door, stairs, handrails, guard systems, ramps).
Any portion of a dwelling or residential accessory structure that will be used for commercial
        purposes (open to employees or the public).  Examples include:
             Professional offices
                    Business offices
                    Notaries
                    Beauty shops, nail salons, barber shops.
                    Car or equipment repair.

Permits must be applied for and issued before any work may begin.  All work performed on residential buildings and their accessory structures must comply with the most current edition of the International Residential Code, published by the International Code Council.




The Callery Borough Building Code Inspector is Professional Code Services.  You can contact PCS by telephone at 724-449-2633 or visit their website    www.pcs-codes.com.